Five Reasons Botswana is perfect for your Dream African Safari

If geography isn’t your forte and you don’t know a whole lot about the continent of Africa, then you might have no inkling as to why Botswana is an incredible destination for your dream safari experience or what makes it special! Let me share with you a little about the country itself and then we’ll get in to the reasons why it is perfect for your dream safari!

Botswana is a land-locked country bordered by Namibia, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Zambia. Over 70% of the country is the semi-arid, Kalahari desert, but within that desert is one of Africa’s Seven Natural Wonders, the Okavango Delta which floods every year and then evaporates. Botswana is one of the least densely populated areas in the world and its economy and standard of living are one of the highest in Africa!

hmmm … Maybe it’s not the ‘Africa’ you’ve been picturing for Safari! It’s low human population and large number of protected areas is a perfect harmony for wildlife viewing. Some of the amazing animals you can see on safari in Botswana are: lions, leopards, cheetahs, caracals, rhinos, hippos, crocodiles, giraffes, zebras, monkeys, bat-eared foxes, wild dogs and various antelope such as the kudu, impala and lechwe. Not sure what all of those are? You’ll be well-educated about these and may other animals after a week on safari with your expert guides!

Check out these five amazing reasons you should enjoy your dream safari in Botswana!

1. If you are an elephant lover, you will not be disappointed in Botswana! This beautiful country is home to Africa’s highest concentration of elephants! Sure, you can see elephants in many African countries, but Botswana is special for the sheer number of them. There are estimated to be over 130,000 elephants in Botswana, although it is hard to get exact numbers as the ones who make their homes near borders, roam freely between countries.

Momma and baby elephant in Chobe National Park, Botswana.

2. If you are truly interested in the well-being of our earth, the land and the animals that you are dreaming of visiting, let me tell you that Botswana is top of class when it comes to conservation and anti-poaching measures. They take poaching so seriously that they have a ‘shoot-to-kill’ law that allows rangers to literally shoot to kill anyone, unauthorized, who makes their way into reserves, parks or protected areas after dark. For this reason, all game drives close down at dusk and boats no longer traverse the waters of the Chobe River and the Delta. Not to worry, you are perfectly safe at your camp. Poachers are doing their best to avoid camps and people so they make their way to the deepest parts of the bush. The roadways, waterways and bush are highly patrolled by skilled rangers and anti-poaching units to protect wildlife in general, but most specifically Elephants, Rhinos and Pangolins.

Elephant in the Okavango Delta Region, Botswana

3. If you are a photographer or birder, you’ll be particularly taken with the colorful sights and sounds of Botswana! Home to over 595 species of birds, you’ll just have to look a different direction to find something new. Your safari guides are adept at deciphering and sometimes even mocking, bird-calls, almost as if they were part bird themselves!

4. One of Africa’s Seven Wonders, the Okavango Delta is truly spectacular. In the middle of the Kalahari desert, each year the inundation arrives and the plains fill to the brim with water. This begins most years, in March and continues to swell until August, before receding. What most people don’t understand about the delta is that it does not rise because of rains in Botswana. The water comes from rains in Angola, in the north, and can take nearly six months to make its way south into the great delta panhandle. The Okavango Delta is home to an incredible and diverse variety of wildlife, some whom have adapted specifically to live in both the desert and water-filled delta conditions.

Sunset on the Okavango Delta.

5. One of the biggest reasons I loved traveling in Botswana and that I love recommending Botswana to clients looking for a safari is for the different activities and styles of safari. While your anticipated game drives in open vehicle trucks will take you through great game-viewing such as, Chobe National Park, you also have the opportunity to speed along the Chobe River in and out of the tributaries on small boats perfect for bird watching, a fishing experience and to get a water-level view of elephants basking in the waters, hippo, water buffalo taking a drink and so much more! Keep your eyes open for incredible birdlife who stick close to the water and incredible crocodiles!

You can take a river cruise on the Chobe River in various levels of luxury, from four to forty passenger boats, where you get the experience of sleeping on the boat each night and exploring in smaller boats during the day. Or you can stay in a unique houseboat deep within the Okavango Delta! If you have the chance to enjoy a mokoro ride, don’t miss out! The polers are particularly adept and moving you in and around the delta, through the reeds and lily pads.

By land, you can stay at lodges and do open-truck, safari game-drives, or you might stay at one where all the safaris are done by some form of boat. Then there is the adventure, education and excitement of heading out into the African bush with your ranger on foot to learn about the plants, trees, animal tracks and smaller, but equally important insects and amphibians that you don’t encounter from your truck.

Want something even more unique? How about a horseback safari, riding along side a herd of elephants or zebras, a hot air balloon ride to see the vastness from above or a light aircraft sight-seeing flight to take in the wonders of the inundation of the Okavango Delta?

You can take a safari in many countries in Africa and each have their own special, unique features, but I for one, am a fan of Botswana for its beauty, its waters and its unwavering commitment to protecting the flora and fauna, which in turn help protect our earth as a whole. It’s all intertwined. We only have one Mother Earth.

If you’d like to start the conversation about your dream safari in Botswana, or explore other option, reach out by email or phone 902 402 7646.

Airline Prices in a Crisis

Covid-19 has set the world into a frenzy that saw thousands of people in difficult situations, trying to get home on some of the last flights departing many destinations. I understand that people are frustrated by not being able to find flights at a reasonable cost, but I’d like to clear up a common misconception.

AIRLINES DO NOT RAISE PRICES DURING A CRISIS!

At any time of a ‘normal’ year, if you try to book a one way flight anywhere internationally, on short notice (1-5 days, maybe even up to 14 days), prices are going to be high, you’ve probably just rarely had to do that, so you are surprised when you see it. The airline is not out to get you. They haven’t raised their prices. They aren’t trying to gouge you, but yes, the ticket price could be five times higher than what you paid.

Here’s what’s happening.

There are a fixed number of seats on any plane. Each airline has a variety of options ranging from the most restrictive of fares in economy class to the most flexible of fares in Business Class. While you and your bestie may sit side by side on the plane, have the exact same size seat and get the same meals and service, you may have paid two very different prices. Sometimes they could be hundreds of dollars difference.

How can that be?

Most people just think of it as Economy, Premium Economy or Business class, each with their own section of the plane, but it’s far more complicated than that.

It’s not just about the physical location on the plane. The prices are based on a package of benefits. It includes the location of your seat on the plane, the leg room, if your luggage and seat selection are included, if your ticket is non-refundable, changeable or refundable for a fee and how many loyalty points you earn. Then it is also based on the level of service you receive on board, how many flight attendants per passenger there are, the quality of food and extra amenities like hot face cloths and champagne served before take off, just to name a few.

Each class of service has a different set of rules, and a different amount of flexibility. The cheaper the price, the fewer benefits you get and the more restrictive the fare is. If you pay for a business class flexible ticket, you can change or refund for no fee in some cases. If you pay for a cheap, basic economy ticket, if you need to change, you are SOL my friend. You get to buy a brand new ticket and you don’t get a refund for the cheap one you bought earlier.

Keeping in line with this, as you can imagine, the bulk of the seats on a plane fall into Economy Class. Within that, there are various pricing levels with different flexibility options when it comes to inclusions, refunds and cancellations. You might have paid $100, but have a fully non-refundable ticket, pay for your luggage separately and only collect 25% loyalty points. The person sitting to your left might have paid $300, have a change fee of $150 and be getting 50% loyalty points. The person on your right pay have paid $500, have a change fee of $50 and be getting 100% loyalty points. All of you are in Economy seating.

Woah! Did I just blow your mind?

Covid-19 Crisis

Now, let’s bring it back to Covid-19, or any crisis, really, where people for whatever reason need to buy flights on short notice.

Airline tickets are normally available for purchase somewhere about 10 – 11 months in advance. It varies a bit by airline and route, but that’s a general rule of thumb.

Most people buy their airline tickets three to nine months in advance. Of course there are always people who buy flights, especially domestically, one or two months in advance.

The majority of people book into the Economy Class category where they are looking for the cheapest flight to get them to their destination. Let’s just say, for ease of math, there are 100 seats on a plane. 10 are business class, 20 are Premium Economy and the remaining 70 are Economy. Break it down further now and of those 10 business class, you have five basic business class and five flexible business class. In Premium Economy you have 10 flexible and 10 more restricted. In Economy, there could be up to four variations and different prices, so 17-18 seats at each level. In this example alone, that gives you eight different price points.

To complicate things further, the prices on International flights fluctuate not just with the class of service, but with the exchange rate of the connecting flights that are going through different countries and the taxes of each separate airport, which also fluctuate with exchange rate. Sorry, there is no ‘fixed price’ for an international flight.

If you are flying Halifax – Toronto – Frankfurt – Addis Ababa – Johannesburg and then return, you are affected by the taxes at five airports in four countries and the exchange rates of four different currencies that fluctuate daily.

If the majority of people buy their flights six to nine months in advance and are looking for the cheapest prices, what do you think is the first to sell out? That’s right, the cheapest fares on the flight with the most restrictive rules and fewest inclusions.

And, at two months prior to take off, what do you think is left? The higher priced classes of service within Economy, with more inclusions and fewer restrictions. By this point, you’ll also often find that Premium Economy is sold out as many people choose to pay extra for the extra comfort and benefits offered. Then you are left with Business Class, if it’s not full, and the most flexible options of Economy class.

Fast forward to the plane being nearly sold out one month in advance. People who were late buying their tickets missed out on the cheapest level of service and paid more. They likely don’t understand that they have a more lax cancellation policy or that the cheaper price didn’t included luggage.

Let’s say there are five seats remaining on the plane, because 95% of the plane sold out more than one month in advance. Let’s say there are three Economy seats, one Premium Economy and one business class seat available.

All of a sudden on March 13th, 2020 you are already in destination and discover that you need to get home before the borders close on the 15th at midnight due to a crazy pandemic. Let’s call it Covid-19!

There is one flight left and it has five seats available but 100 people trying to get those five seats. The prices of the five seats don’t change, but once the three cheaper economy seats sell out, all that’s left is Premium and Business Class. To make it more complicated, if you are searching for two seats, for you and your partner, and two of the economy class seats have already sold, you’ll get an error saying there are no seats available.

Not quite true! I’ll tell you a secret; one of you could go in economy and one in Premium Economy, but an online system won’t tell you this, or allow you to book this easily or quickly enough when there is high demand. You could get one seat booked and then the other one is gone and one of you is staying behind. How’s that for scary?

Travel agents have ways around this … It might literally be the difference in both of you getting on the same plane or not. You might not pay the same price for both seats, but you might arrive home together!

It is the same reason that your travel agent will tell you not to wait until last minute to book flights for your vacation and that it is very unlikely there will be a ‘sale’ if you wait until one month prior to travel. The cheap seats will already be sold out, therefore you end up paying a higher price. The airlines did not raise the prices, you are just paying the rate of the day for the class of service that is available at that time.

In a crisis situation, where countries are restricting travel and closing borders, it is also important to note that there are many fewer routing options available and much higher demand for those last few seats. If you don’t get on them quickly, you might miss out. It’s good to have a professional watching for these things for you while you are on vacation!

There are lots of reasons to book with a good travel agent. The intricacies of airline bookings are just one of many. If you get stuck abroad due to a natural disaster, or pandemic, do you want to deal with it alone, spending hours on hold trying to reach each airline or would you rather have a professional taking care of the arrangements for you and telling you what you should do next?

If you’d like to work with a professional on your next trip, for peace of mind and so many other great benefits, I’d be happy to hear from you at stucker@tpi.ca or 902 402 7646.

5 Questions from Elite Travel Blog

I have recently been asked to participate in a series with Elite Travel Blog where they invite travel bloggers to share their favourite memories. Below you can find my responses, but you should stop by their site and get some inspiration from many of the other bloggers who participated!

Why do you love travel?

My love of travel was born out of a fear of planes. In 1997 I survived a plane crash in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. I got on a plane shortly after the crash, which was a horrible decision and then I did not fly again for 11 years. Eventually, I decided that the world was too amazing to be missed. From that point on, I stepped cautiously into the travel world and a few years later, here I am making my way around the world!

For me, travel is such an interesting mix of emotions. The flights are still difficult for me nearly 20 years after my plane crash and can still cause me anxiety, but to not be able to experience the world in all of it’s wonders would feel like I hadn’t really lived.

It’s like opening presents everyday of the year because there is always something new and exciting to do. For the same reasons, it can be equally as exhausting when your brain is always taking in new things and never has a routine. With all of its ups and downs, I love travel because it has opened my mind to new ways of thinking. Through travel I have overcome challenges, learned when to be independent and when not to be.

For me, travel is: empowering, frightening, overwhelming and beautiful. Travel is the air that I breathe that gives me life and purpose.

What destination is top of your bucket list? 

As with any travel blogger, narrowing it down to just one place at the top of my bucket list is very difficult. So, I’ll choose the over 7000 islands of the Philippines (I reserve the right to change my mind tomorrow!). With Chocolate hills, swimming with whale sharks, kite surfing and festivals galore, my heart beats faster just thinking about it. Yes, I think it is time for me to float, swim, eat and dance my way through the Philippines.

Where is your most favourite place you have travelled to? 

I’ve traveled to 27 countries, most of them in the past seven years. I truly have amazing memories of every single one of them. Of course, some will always stand out more than others. When I traveled to Turkey in September 2015 with Experta Tours  and The Gallipolli Artist, I expected the chaos of Istanbul but what I didn’t expect was the welcoming, friendly hospitality of the locals throughout the country. That hospitality was expanded 100% when I landed in Cappadocia, land of fairy chimneys and some of the greatest landscapes that I have ever laid eyes (and camera) on. From the charm, art and history of the family-run Sofa Hotel to the pure serenity of my sunrise hot air balloon ride over Love Valley. It was a land of dreams come true and place where a piece of my calm heart will forever reside.

What is your most favourite memory or experience whilst travelling?

My favorite memories from travel seem to be when I find serenity and learn something profound. Or is it that serenity finds me and therefore it teaches me something profound?

As a professional photographer who was interested in travel, what could be better than leading photo tours to far away places? In 2012, with the culmination of much hard work and great support from my friends at G Adventures and the Planeterra Foundation, I led my first photo tour to beautiful Peru. My small group of eight passengers made our way to a small village in the Andes mountains called Ccaccaccollo where we organized a portrait day for the families who had never had family portraits taken before. It was a heart-warming experience, despite the language challenges and primitive homes. We photographed as many children, families and elderly as we could and then arranged to have the photos sent back to them to keep. We were greeted with excitement and welcomed like family. Some people wanted their pictures taken with their favorite cat, while others proudly posed by their llama or cattle. It was a life altering experience when many of us really learned that money can not not buy happiness.

A couple of days later, we traveled together to Machu Picchu and sat in the great Lost City surrounded by thick fog. Our leader asked us to take a few moments to sit and enjoy the peacefulness. Some of my group did yoga or meditation, others just sat in awe and some continued about their business taking photos. For me, I will never forget the tears that I shed at the beauty of this magical place. I will never forget the clearness of my mind and the profound changes that Machu Picchu inspired me to make in my life. Forever, the Lost City will be where I found myself.

What is your favourite photo from your travels?

Hot air Ballooning over Love Valley in Cappadocia
Hot air Ballooning over Love Valley in Cappadocia

Fiji!

This is my dear friend (and client) Robin. I knew she was a special soul from the first time I met her when I trusted her to stay in my condo for three weeks with my beloved cat, Morgan. We’ve been friends since. She warms my heart with her travel lessons and the way she seeks beauty in the world. I hope you’ll give her blog a read. She’s a pretty amazing spirit!

Working my way around the world

Working my way around the world.

By now, most of you know that I’m in Europe. Some people understand what I’m doing … others have no clue … so here it is, all spelled out for you … The who, what, where, when, why of my current world.

WHO: Me – traveling all alone and happy about it

WHAT: Working my way around the world. This is not a vacation

WHERE: Europe / South America / Caribbean

WHEN: September 19 – unknown (anticipating returning in March / April 2015)

WHY: I am passionate about traveling, trying new things, being outdoors, discovering new foods and cultures. I have no commitments and no home, so I can live a free life … at least for this point in time.

Although I have my sister and my parents, I have not made a family of my own. Therefore, if I’m going to travel I need to do it sooner rather than later as I might be having a baby later (or not … who knows!) I can only live in the present, I can’t predict the future, so I have to do what’s right for me right now.

Pretty simple isn’t it?

Now, on to the work part of all of this travel …

Contrary to popular belief, I am not rich. I did sell my condo to pay off bills and become debt free, but the profit did not go into an account to ‘fund’ my extended travels. I am not lucky. Luck is not planned and I have planned how to make this all happen.

When I say I’m working my way around the world, I truly mean it. I am a full time travel agent, but also an entrepreneur. I work TPI (Travel Professionals International), a Canadian based travel agency, but I manage my own clients and own hours. This has given me the full capability to work from anywhere in the world … so I’m doing just that! If you give me a call, shoot me an email or care to skype with me, you’ll still be able to reach me … I just might be eating delicious gelato in Dubrovnik or sitting at a café in Kotor. It doesn’t stop me from being able to work … it’s just a different environment.

The goal for me is to travel a lot over the next year, but continue to sell travel to my clients who are mostly in Nova Scotia (although they don’t have to be!). How does that work you ask? Well, just about all of my research, planning and consulting is done via internet. I only have a few clients who I meet face to face regularly. So I still offer the exact same services as I did when I was working 9-5 in office, but now I do it from a café when I’m in Halifax, or I could be in a European café, an Argentinian estancia or a hotel wherever I may be at that time.

I know it is hard for people to understand, but I am exploring the world, seeing as much as I can, but also balancing it with enough work to keep my clients happy and food in my tummy.

My travel agent colleagues on the ship keep telling me I work too much. Even they can’t seem to understand that I’m not on vacation. And, I’m actually not working that much. And really, if I wasn’t working right now, what would they expect me to do? Drink? Well … we all know that’s not going to get too far as I’m not much of a drinker. Maybe when they ask me if I’m a workaholic, I’ll ask them if they are an alcoholic? Ha ha

Because I am not rich and I do not have a travel fund to keep me going for 6 months, I absolutely must continue to work as a travel agent. I don’t mind; I love my job. I know you are all thinking that’s fantastic, and it is, but it has its downfalls too!

My three biggest struggles at the moment are:

  1. Lack of reliable internet. Although I was very confident internet would be easy to find and accessible on my cruise, it isn’t as easy as I expected. I can purchase internet on the ship (which I don’t mind), but it is intermittent which means if I’m in the middle of something important and it cuts out I have to start over. That’s not particularly productive.
  2. I could go in to shore each day and access internet, but often it is a 15 – 20 minute tender each way from the ship to shore. If I go in to the city to work in the morning I have to take all of my camera gear and both laptops and then take them walking around or on tour with me. Not only is it cumbersome, but heavy too!
  3. Balance (which is funny to write about as I sit in the piano lounge of the bar on board the Royal Clipper with it listing). Now, I knew this was going to be a difficult one and it would take some practice, but I somehow thought it would be easier. It is incredibly difficult to balance wanting to see and do everything in all of these new amazing countries (Croatia & Montenegro so far) with needing to attend to work clients. I suspect it will get much better once I’m settled in one spot for a few days, but for now, this first few days have been very unbalanced. Having said that, I have had a fantastic time exploring Croatia & Montenegro so far and it just makes me more determined to catch up on work as soon as I can.

Now that you know what it is that I’m doing, I hope you’ll follow along for the upcoming blogs about each of my destinations … the fun times and interesting conversations I’ve had and reviews about many of the suppliers and products that I’ve been involved with.

At this point (Sept 25), I only have two days left on the ship and then I’m heading through Italy for 12 days. Posts will hopefully be more regular from here on out and photos coming soon too!

Air France Strike

Air France Strike

With my flight originally scheduled from Halifax to Venice on Sept 18th, when Air France pilots officially went on strike on Sept 15th it was devastating. I had been so incredibly busy with finishing up work files and trying to plan my own trip that I already felt maxed.

Air France had a release out that said they would be operating at 48% of flights. For those affected by cancellations, they could reschedule free of charge within specific date ranges (and within their original class of service or they could get a full refund.

Being only four days from departure, I knew that changing my flights would be nearly impossible because everything would be sold out and even if I found new flights with Air France that fit the restrictions, it was possible that those flights could be cancelled too seeing as they weren’t announcing cancellations until 24 hours in advance.

I got busy making phone calls as soon as the strike was confirmed. I started by calling my insurance company to see what the procedure would be and when I could officially make a claim. After much discussion, I was advised that my plan actually wouldn’t cover anything to do with strike action even though I had booked the flights months before the strike was announced. So, in this particular case I was SOL because insurance wasn’t going to help me out with the cost of new flights or with the money lost for and expensive hotel in Venice that was non-refundable.

Right then and there I was super frustrated. I looked my insurance policy up, but sadly, with the lower package that I had purchased, strike was not included.

Next up, I called my credit card company as I have insurance with them as well … good news … I had medical and baggage coverage with my credit card. Bad news, I did not have interruption insurance. So …. No luck with the credit card.

What does all of that mean?

If my flight was cancelled I could get my money back from the airline (about $1200). I could then use that money to buy a brand new ticket (on short notice), which was going to cost closer to $4000. Hmmm … see the disconnect here?

I started searching for new flight options on my own to see what I could get for the cheapest and still reach Venice on time. I came up with an Air Canada itinerary departing on Sept 19 (a day later), but arriving on Sept 20th, in time for my embarkation. And it even had better routing – Halifax / Toronto / Venice. It would mean forfeiting a night in Venice at a non-refundable hotel and paying about $500 extra for my flight. It sucked, but it was certainly better than not going at all.

Tuesday I tried to forget about it. After all it was possible that my flights might be on the ‘fly’ list instead of cancellation list. Then I’d be all set, nothing would change and I’d arrive in Venice one day early, as planned.

Wednesday the 17th came and I checked for flight updates as soon as I woke up. Sadly, mine was one of the cancelled ones.

I got on the phone to Air France right away. First I tried their public reservations number, which wasn’t open that early in the morning. I was not impressed. In the middle of a strike and customer service / reservations weren’t even taking calls?

Then I found our agent line to Air France and not only did someone answer, but he was super helpful and nice. I went through the situation with him and he began looking for new routing options with me. Finally he found one that would still leave on Sept 18th, but routing would be Halifax / Montreal / Paris … then I would overnight in Paris before heading on to Venice the next morning … still in time for my embarkation. I told him to put those on hold.

A couple of problems though …

No change in flight price, but it would cost me an extra hotel in Paris, as well as transportation. No way I could visit Paris for 24 hours and stay in a hotel room the whole time!

The flights were still with Air France which means they could still be cancelled and then I would be back to square 1.

Once the rep had them on hold I tried to find a later flight from Halifax to Montreal so that I wouldn’t have an 8 hour layover in Montreal. The rep wasn’t able to make changes to that particular portion of the trip as he was only able to change the Air France segments. He put me through to their booking department and I had a nice chat with a rep there who went above and beyond to get me exactly what I needed.

She checked Air France, KLM and Delta flighs again, but everything was sold out. This is what happens when one company cancels half of their flights, the other airlines fill up very quickly. Having not found anything suitable, she asked if it would be ok if I checked with other airlines. Hell yes! I don’t have any particular loyalties to airline companies. I just wanted to get to Venice on time for my Star Clippers cruise. I was not prepared to miss that!

As soon as she asked me that, I told her about the good Air Canada flights that I had found and I just thought she wasn’t able to switch me to them. After about 20 – 30 minutes on the phone with her, she had cancelled the ‘on hold’ flights with the overnight in Paris, rounded up my new request for flights and had sent it off to get confirmation.

Phew! Was I ever happy when she told me that Air Canada approved the change and she sent me a new eticket.

What does that mean? It meant that I didn’t have to pay to reroute or change my date, I didn’t have to get a refund and then pay a crazy amount more for flights with another airline, I got better routing and got to collect Aeroplan points for the flight which I wouldn’t have been able to do with the other routing. It still left me missing out on a night in Venice and a $300 hotel, but in the grand scheme of things, that was pretty minor and I was thrilled to have it taken care of.

Besides, I barely made it to the airport on time on Friday because I was still packing and doing errands. There’s no way that I would have gotten it all done to leave on Thursday!

The lesson here for all of you is two fold:

  1. Check all of your insurance policies (work / credit card / purchased through an agent) to see if your policy covers airline strike.
  2. Use a travel agent to book your trip. I spent an hour and a half on the phone with Air France plus a couple of hours looking at new routing myself. And, if I hadn’t had access to the travel agent emergency line I have no idea how long it would have taken to get it all settled and how frustrated I would have been as a regular customer not knowing what all of my options were.

Despite the incredible number of customers from that 52% of flights that were cancelled, the staff that I spoke to both gave wonderful customer service despite working over time and likely having to deal with a lot of agents (or customers) looking for miracle solutions.

Although I was happy to gain my Aeroplan points and have better routing, I mostly was just pleased with the knowledge and friendliness of the Air France staff who did exactly what I needed.

Renovations – Part 3

Feb 22nd – Renovation Update

Three weeks ago I was calling contractors and having them in to quote on doing renovations with the goal of having everything complete in early March. I guess that was a little ambitious of me. Both in the matter that I had a lot of decisions to make (I’m a slow decider) and in that contractors have their own way of dealing with time and deadlines.

Here’s what has been accomplished, along with approximate working hours to complete.

Carpet removal from upstairs – 8 hours
Staple pulling & clean up – 9+ hours
Taking carpet to recycle depot – 1.5 hours

Removing cabinet doors in kitchen (hinges & handles) – 2.5 hours
Removing wallpaper in kitchen & clean up – 10 hours

Cleaning out kitchen cupboards & boxing items – 3 hours (only 1/2 done)

Removing face plates, switch covers & hand rails – 1 hour (1/2 done)

Researching & Buying supplies:
Flooring – Home Depot / Kent / Happy Harry’s / Floors Plus
Paint – Home Depot / Kent / Color Your World / Sherwin Williams

6 hours meeting with friends and contractors for quotes & discussing plan of action
3.5 hours meeting with real estate agents

4 hours (2 separate evenings) – researching paint colours in general
6 – 8 hours (with my sister on a Saturday) – Happy Harry’s / Floors Plus / Kent – Bought flooring / handles / hinges / backsplash tile and carted everything from the car to the house. Had to make two trips to Kent to get the flooring. Looked at kitchen lighting.
1 hour (lunch break) – researching paint colour

Random other things that needed to be done.
4 hours – sorting items, donating to Value Village, putting items on kijiji
2 hours – emailing Photo Tour participants & Young & Fearless participants about photo pick ups.
Undetermined amount of time for kijiji & photo pick ups.
2 hours Financial Planner
1 hour finding out exact debt amounts (Line of credit / vehicle / mortgage)

That appears to be a total of approximately 64 hours in the last 3 weeks. Geeze, no wonder I’m exhausted! And, that doesn’t count the 10 – 15 hours of overtime I’ve done at work in the last two weeks.

How will you see the world through your lens?

Every year that I take photographers on a photo tour I am absolutely amazed and inspired by each of them. It is unbelievable how a group of people can stand in the same place and capture so many different perspectives. It truly gives you a feel for what other people are seeing, through their eyes … through their lens.

The Vietnam: Through the Lens Photo Tour will be no different. It offers a variety of classroom workshops, hands on practice and loads of camaraderie that will leave participants inspired and sometimes overwhelmed by the world and the beauty around them.

If you are interested in improving your photography skills while discovering the culture and beauty of Vietnam, now is the time to get in touch.

I’m looking for four more people to join us on this next amazing journey.
Final deadline to book your spot is December 31st, but please contact me ASAP to confirm space is available.

VIETNAM: Through the Lens
April 6 – 19th, 2014

$2780 (land based)

Tour Highlights will include:

Two photo workshops including a variety of classroom learning & a lot of hands on practice.

City tours of Hanoi, Hoi An and Ho Chi Minh

One night on a beautiful junk boat in Halong Bay – visits to floating villages / sunset & sunrise from the boat

Hoi An Volunteering by taking photos for STREETS International to help end the cycle of poverty through education and work opportunities.

Hoi An Full Moon Festival – where the city closes its streets to traffic and stores are adorned with beautiful coloured lanterns.

Mekong Delta Homestay – 1 night

Traveling by boat along the Mekong Delta

If you are interested in more information, please send me an email – info@sharitucker.com

South East Asia – Chapter 16 – Shwedagon Pagoda

Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon, Myanmar

Probably the biggest tourist attraction in Yangon is the enormous Shwedagon Pagoda. Nearly 25 000 people visit it per day on the weekend. Although, most of this is actually locals, not tourists.

We only spent about an hour wandering around the inside area of the Pagoda, but I could have spent much longer! Thankfully, our local guide took us to have our astrology reading done where we sat in the coolness of one of the buildings, out of the scorching mid-day sun. After our astrology readings, we bought the flowers as per each of our readings and then used them as an offering to the shrine for our day of birth, where we also poured an uneven number of cups of water on our symbols.

Here’s a quick little photo essay. Put your sunglasses on and get ready for a whirlwind of gold!

South East Asia – Chapter 10 – The Streets of Yangon

I woke up at 4:30am on August 17th and couldn’t seem to get back to sleep. I guess jet lag had me on weird hours. Could have been worse though. I dilly dallied around until about 6:00am when I decided to get out of bed and get my day pack ready to go exploring.

At 7am I headed down to the lobby for breakfast. While I was waiting for my food, we heard a bit of commotion outside and I could see a row of young monks walking by in their pink and orange robes, each carrying their silver container. I ran outside to see what was going on (typical tourist).

The row of monks stopped about two doors down from the hotel and stood in a line while someone from a nearby truck did some announcements. I really wasn’t sure if I should be photographing them or not, so I didn’t. When they didn’t leave right away, I went back inside my hotel to ask at the front desk if it was ok to photograph them and they told me yes. So, I walked to the front of the line of young monks and moments later, they started walking again. I turned my go-pro toward them and recorded them while they walked by. (or not, apparently I didn’t have it set on video so I got Nothing! boo me).

I went back into the lobby to eat my breakfast which consisted of three pieces of toast, two large slices of delicious watermelon and two barely cooked eggs.

Then, I headed out on a mission to find the Sule Pagoda which was only a few blocks away.

Here’s a quick video of what the streets in Yangon are like at around 8am on a Saturday morning. This was after I had gone to photograph the Pagoda and I was on my way back to the hotel.