When can we Travel Again? A Travel Agent’s Opinion

In recent weeks, cities, communities and countries around the world have all begun to slowly make their way out of self-isolation. Some countries faster than others; some still struggling with near impossible numbers of Covid-19 overwhelming their health care systems (or non-systems). The number of deaths in the past few months is heartbreaking.

Here in Nova Scotia, and Eastern Canada in general, we’ve faired well, at least in the Covid numbers game. We locked down early, people followed the rules (for the most part) and we’re opening up slowly. I remember early on when governments were telling us, if we do this well, the effects will be minor and you’ll wonder why we made all of these sacrifices; that’s how we know that we’ve succeeded and that it worked.

Whether you agree with the government’s harsh restrictions, social distancing and closing of a large chunk of the economy, or whether you don’t, you can’t argue that we’ve come through relatively unscathed in comparison to the world’s hotspots such as Italy, Brazil and the US. This is not to diminish the lives lost to the disease and all of the other tragedies we’ve had to endure as Nova Scotians in the past few weeks. We’ve certainly had a lot thrown at us in 2020.

Trust me, no one wants the world economy to open up more than me (and everyone else in the tourism industry). My business has all but been demolished as the ground fell out from under the tourism industry in one big collapse. But, I’m still here!

Like many of you, I had my big travel plans for this year cancelled. I was meant to be in Australia for just over three weeks with my mom in May.

With the recent announcement of Air Canada’s summer destinations and schedule, I’d love for all of you (and me too), to be able to hop on a plane this summer and go somewhere … anywhere … safely and in good health, but realistically, what does that look like?

While countries around the world are lifting restrictions and beginning to open up to tourists, there’s still a lot to be done before international travel is viable on a large scale. Although I’m all for day dreaming about travel, I think logistically we need to start right here at home.

Halifax has never been overly well connected to the world with direct flights. A few to the US, a few to the Caribbean in the winter and in the past few years, a few direct flights to Europe. Now, with the Halifax airport running only about 2% of its normal flights, you can be sure you’ll need to pass through Toronto or Montreal before going international.

With Ontario and Quebec being some of our hardest hit provinces, that holds concern for a lot of travellers just to get out of Canada. Flying through the US is also not an option until at least after June 22nd at this point. While technically there are still a few flights between countries, they are for essential travel and cargo, not for leisure travel.

And, let’s not forget that the Canadian Government still has an Avoid Non-Essential Travel advisory out, worldwide, for Canadians. This means that they still feel the risk level is very high for travellers and it also means your travel insurance will be extremely limited if you choose to travel despite the warnings. Don’t forget to ask me (or your travel insurance provider) about Cancel for Any Reason policies, which I think will become the new norm for most travellers.

In my opinion, and it is just that, an opinion, I think it’ll be early August before we see the Avoid Non-Essential Travel Advisory lifted. While you may be able to get a flight Internationally for leisure purposes before then, it’s important to look at all of the risk factors. And, these are different for everyone. Personally, I’m very unlikely to travel before that advisory is lifted. It’s just too risky.

It’s exciting to hear about Air Canada increasing their flight schedule and destinations for the summer; to hear about countries around the world beginning to open up; and murmurs of international travel bubbling to the surface. But let’s not forget that many places still have 14 day quarantine requirements on arrival, not to mention on return to Canada. Some countries are also implementing same day Covid testing at their airports so that you can avoid the quarantine, but that poses the question, what if you are asymptomatic but test positive? Or, what if you get sick on your fifth day of vacation? On the surface, it may seem like a good idea to test everyone before allowing them to wander at will, but it’s far from fool proof.

You might be hearing in the news (if you haven’t shut it off completely) about lots of countries with plans to open up to travellers for June and July which are great steps in the right direction, but it’s important to look closely to determine who is allowed to travel. For example, most of the European countries are opening to domestic and regional travel first with plans for international travel to open up at a later date. It’s great to see that many countries with land borders are partnering up to boost tourism between their countries, freely, but they aren’t yet ready to allow international travellers in.

If you are looking at potential for somewhere to go this fall in Europe, my feeling is that Greece and Portugal will both be great options, as will Iceland and Greenland. All are anticipated to open in June / July for international tourists. I hope that Italy will be ready as well, as they need tourism dearly after the difficulties that they had with Covid, but it is yet to be seen when International tourism will return to any of these destinations for sure. Hopefully we’ll know more by the end of June or mid-July.

Lisbon, Portugal
Cinque Terre, Italy

Moving on to the Caribbean, various parts of Mexico, Dominican Republic, Antigua, Saint Lucia, Grenada and more, are reopening throughout June and July for tourists with various rules and regulations. Flights with West Jet and Air Canada are resuming out of Toronto or Montreal for many of these destinations at the end of June or beginning of July, although at a much lower frequency than past years.

I suspect most Maritimers will be waiting until the winter to head south. If you missed your Spring vacation this year, or you just need another one, you won’t be alone! Lots of travellers are booking All Inclusive and cruise vacations right now for November/December and March Break. If you wish to ignore the Avoid Non Essential Travel Advisory though, Saint Lucia is a great spot to go in June and they are not requiring you to quarantine for 14 days on arrival, so you can enjoy your vacation without stress. You may, however, still have to quarantine when you return to Canada depending what each province decides in the next few weeks.

South America and Africa are a little farther behind. They are having more difficulties with the testing and treatment of Covid-19 patients. In many places they have less infrastructure, larger populations of poverty and overall, more obstacles than we do, in fighting the disease. I think you’ll see most of these countries remain closed until the beginning of September. And then, it is yet to be sen if they will open up internationally or just regionally. Argentina, for example, has already grounded international flights until September.

Twelve Apostles Mountain Range, Cape Town, South Africa

Parts of Asia are open, although very few flight options to get you there. Air Canada has flights from Toronto to Hong Kong, Seoul, Shanghai and Tokyo with a small selection of flights from three per week to one per day starting late in June.

Halong Bay, Vietnam

Australia and New Zealand are doing well fighting Covid-19 and are working on an agreement between the two countries to allow travel, but it will be awhile before international travellers can enter without a 14 day quarantine.

All in all, it’s positive to see countries beginning to allow their citizens to move about more. Tourism is starting to open up world wide; restaurants, museums, parks and gardens are slowing getting back to business. This means many people in the tourism industry are going back to work. The progress will be slow over the summer though and many businesses who were forced to close will not reopen this season, if at all. This is the same all around the world.

In my opinion, I think we will be able to travel relatively freely throughout Canada by the beginning of July, hopefully with no further 14 day quarantines for changing provinces. This will also encourage lots of staycations in your own province, road trips to other provinces and domestic travel across the country. This summer and fall are going to be all about supporting local and supporting Canada!

Howe Sound, British Colombia, Canada

I’m hopeful that our borders will stay closed to the US for leisure travel until sometime in July as they have such a long way to go before the situation is controlled. I know the current ban is only until June 22nd, but I hope for an extension of another couple of weeks on top of that. I think shortly after travel to the US is reopened, we’ll see the Avoid Non-Essential travel advisory lifted. I wouldn’t be surprised though, if many provinces continue to recommend 14 day quarantine upon arrival home from international travel. And, unfortunately, that makes it a bit more difficult to take vacation. Unless, of course you work from home and can work and quarantine at the same time, or if you are retired and don’t need to return to work.

Tour operators around the world have suspended their tours until the end of June. Some have already further suspended until the end of July, August or September since it is clear that International travel will not be widely available to all countries this summer. I’m hopeful for September and October trips to Europe and the Caribbean and I’d like to think that international travel will be available to those interested in going to South America, Asia and Africa by November / December.

Of course, having the flights and borders open makes international travel possible, but for many, that won’t be enough to get them travelling again just yet. I know many of you are waiting for vaccines before you travel abroad and rightfully so. Everyone has a different risk tolerance, different health concerns, different family and work matters to attend to.

Most importantly though, when you do decide to travel again, it’s going to be a whole new world of processes, paperwork, testing, rules and regulations. There’s no time like the present to commit to working with a knowledgeable travel agent who will have your back if something goes awry along the way.

Personally, I hope to head across Canada some time late this summer or early fall just before business fully picks up again. Like many of you, I didn’t get my vacation this year and there are many spots in Canada that are worth checking out. Last year I had a fantastic trip to Vancouver, Squamish and Whistler.

This year, I’m thinking maybe Yukon for the Northern Lights or Haida Gwaii islands off the coast of British Colombia or Banff and Jasper. Watch my Facebook Page for upcoming webinars and conversations with companies who provide amazing trips right here in Canada. More information and inspiration will be coming your way soon!

As always, I’m here to help plan your next amazing trip. You can reach me by phone at 902 402 7646 or email – stucker@tpi.ca.

4 Replies to “When can we Travel Again? A Travel Agent’s Opinion”

  1. Thanks Shari, for a very thorough and thoughtful article. One thing you didn’t mention though is airfares. I suspect that regular economy airfares will be staggeringly expensive, except perhaps for package holidays where destinations will be desperate to fill rooms.

    1. Thanks for the comments Bill. I didn’t mention pricing as that’s a whole different topic. I didn’t want to make this post any longer 🙂

      The entire tourism industry is desperate for clients … airlines, hotels, tours … you name it, we’ve all been devastated. In my opinion, I think airfares will be slightly higher, but not ridiculously so. I don’t anticipate them to be double, by any means. I think there is a delicate balance for airlines who need to fill a certain number of seats to make a flight profitable vs pricing them so high that clients can’t afford them. I do expect, in general, that airfares will be higher. I don’t think it’s possible to introduce all of the new protocols, equipment, cleaning, staffing requirements, coupled with fewer overall passengers, without at least a small increase in prices. I haven’t booked any flights since March though, so I don’t have any actual numbers to compare at this point.

      As for package holidays, a large portion of the pricing on a package holiday is airfare, so I don’t think you’ll see dirt cheap prices on all inclusives either. At least not as a whole. I don’t doubt there will be some loss-leader sales out there to entice customers, but I don’t think it’ll be widespread. Hard to know for sure though until travel restrictions are lifted and borders are re-opened.

      Where’s the first place you’d like to go, provided it’s not cost prohibitive?

  2. Thank you Shari. It will be interesting to see what happens when the restrictions are lifted. I think I will pause and see if Covid resurfaces. Such unpredictable times. I hope your business makes you busier than a one armed paper hanger and you recoup any losses you have incurred from this bat eating chaos.

    1. Thanks for reading Karen. Yes, I think there are still a lot of unknowns and we just have to wait and see what each country decides to do. I don’t doubt I’ll be plenty busy come this fall when we know more. As for recouping losses … that will be over the next several years unfortunately. 🙁

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